Kigelia Africana

Definition/Short Discription: 

Kigelia Africana Fruit/Sausage tree

Traditional Applications

For centuries, the sausage tree has been used as a valuable herbal medicine by a number of traditional healers and African communities. All the parts of the tree (fruits, leaves, bark and roots) are widely used by traditional healers across different African cultures to treat several health conditions. For example, the fruits are used to manage skin conditions like fungal infections, eczema, psoriasis, boils and leprosy. In fact, the sausage tree is widely recognized for its remarkable effectiveness in improving the firmness and elasticity of the skin. In some African cultures, women use the sap from the fruit of the tree for firming the skin around their breasts. The plant is also claimed to have potent wound healing activity and for treatment of skin cancers. The leaves, seeds and fruit pulp are dried, powdered and then applied to treat wounds. The fresh and dried fruits can be boiled with water and given to patients to treat ulcers, sores, syphilis and rheumatism.

Kigelia's known chemical constituents include:
- Napthaquinones (including kigelinone)
- Fatty acids (including vernolic)
- Courmarins (including kigelin)
- Iridoids
- Caffeic acid
- Norviburtinal
- Sterols (including sitosterol and stigmasterol)

The steroids are known to help a range of skin conditions, notably eczema, and the flavonoids have clear hygroscopic and fungicidal properties. Strong anecdotal evidence suggests that it is effective in the treatment of solar keratosis, skin cancer and Kaposi sarcoma, an HIV-related skin ailment. New research by PhytoTrade Africa has supported anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

Clinical Studies

laboratory studies conducted at the University of Nigeria in conjunction with Chelsea Pharmacy Department, London.[1],[2] The researchers conducted in-vitro tests for the efficacy of an aqueous extract of stem bark and two major iridoids against Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Their conclusion was that 'the extract tested had pronounced inhibitory effect against all microorganisms'.

These tests gave validity to the traditional use as a natural antibacterial. Chemical analyses of the roots, wood and leaves of the tree have shown the presence of napthoquinones, dihydroisocoumarins, flavonoids and aldehydic iridoid derivatives.

Breast firming clinical studies

The tested product is a gel of Carbopol containing 5% of Kigelia Fruit Extract.
The product is applied once a day with a prolonged massage, covering the whole bust area and the neck during 4 weeks. The 10 volunteers are between 30 and 45 year old women, with at least one pregnancy, and a breast measurement less than 90 cm.

The opening angle shows the improvement of the curve position and raising up of the bosom and decreasing in the photo.
BUST FIRMNESS IMPROVEMENT = 50 %
CUTANEOUS FIRMNESS IMPROVEMENT = 55 %
CUTANEOUS ELASTICITY IMPROVEMENT = 70 %
GENERAL IMPRESSION ABOUT Kigelia is MORE THAN 50% SATISFIED WOMEN

Conclusion
Due to its exceptional firming properties, Kigelia helps improve firmness and elasticity of the skin

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By Anonymous on 04 May 2011